Here is mine :) May be a bit Random, but 100 % Authentic. Love and Light: Aila

What the hell am I doing here..?

That is the question I hear Sunil repeat time to time while giving us the philosophy lecture, and quite frankly, I have been asking that several times during the three weeks I have been in India. It started when I was at the New Delhi airport, waiting three hours for the guy who was supposed to pick me up, not really wanting to leave the safety of the airport which seemed like my final link to my comfort zone. But eight hours later I was in the room that was supposed to be my home for the next three weeks, feeling cold and alone. I didn´t know the wifi password so I didn´t have any connection to the world as I had known before.

But I had made a commitment, which I later realized was my sankalpa: I would have an open heart and an open mind and take whatever I was given with open arms. I would attend everything 100 % even when I didn´t feel like and my legs would be tired of sitting on the floor in a meditative posture and see where it would lead. I would let someone else decide when I wake up, what I eat, when I do my intestinal cleansing and even when I breath in and out. And now, sitting in the same room three weeks later I can reassure it has been all worth it.

The reason I came to India might be kind of a western cliché: I got burnt out at my job, rehabilitated myself with yoga and realized I want to do something more with my life than work for the Swedish state. I attended a TTC in Sweden which only raised more questions about the union which is supposed to happen in yoga. A union with what, and how do I reach that? Is it even possible? Can I really teach yoga if I don´t understand the meaning of yoga? So I decided to make an effort to go closer to the source and found myself chanting mantras, doing pranayama and practicing yoga nidra which I knew was ”yogic sleep”, but what the hell is that really?

A week later I found myself being content in a somewhat new way: I didn´t really miss anything. Chanting made me calm and I enjoyed walking to the shala 6 am to do the morning ashtanga and pranayama practice. I was constantly busy but I didn´t feel I needed more time, a washing machine, the internet or even coffee.

Today I have done the final exam and realized I was in a somewhat new situation: I don´t really have to spend every free moment studying the Baghvad Gita or the Hatha Yoga Pradipika (or memorizing asana names or practicing how to teach) and there is no evening meditation to attend.

So the next question is, what the hell am I going to do in Sweden? Will everything be the same? Am I going to stress to my job every morning, forget to breath, drink too much coffee and lose the feeling of contentment? Get caught up in all the so called demands of having a title, an apartment or as we say in Sweden: a Volvo, a dog and an house?

That is the real question. Sunil also says that during these three weeks we invest, our bodies are aching, we are confused of everything, we cleanse our body and our mind. We do pranayama and meditation, but we only get the effects of it all later. And there is no use of cleansing unless we keep our body and mind clean even afterwards. You don´t clean your home just in order to throw some dirt in it directly afterwards. So the real sadhana begins after India and it is not going to be easy. It is diffucult to combine our jobs with yoga, pranayama, meditation. It is hard to apply all of the yamas and niyamas in real life. But it would be stupid to do all of these things for a few weeks just so that I can go back to my old routines: after all I was I snowball that needed to be shaken so some of the snowflakes would fall of and I would reach closer to the core and see things for what they are.

I would advise anyone who needs to be shaken a bit to come here. But I would also say that you need two things: to know what the hell you are doing here and make it your sankalpa to be open to whatever you´re thrown at and take it with open arms. Give cleansing a chance and then you will know.

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Golden advice from the Tattvaa Yogashala founder & friends

We have collected some feedback just for you! Hear the experiences and advice first hand from the staff at Tattvaa Yogashala both past and present volunteers and Kamal ji himself. What you must know is once you have been welcomed into the Tattvaa home; you will always be a part of the ever growing worldwide family. The doors are always open; all you have to do is ask to come inside. If you’ve ever completed a TTC or just spent time at the drop in classes you would definitely have felt the infectious energy Kamal Singh transcends to all his students. Here are a few of those people’s perspectives after volunteering, assisting or participating in a teacher training program at Tattvaa Yogashala.

 

Yogi Kamal Singh – Founder of Tattvaa Yogashala, Rishikesh.  – “Enjoy every Breath you take and every movement you make.  Be Here Now and prepared, Rest will come to you.”

 

Sunil Sharma – Rishikesh. “Sit quietly and breathe. All is well when you stop doing and allow yourself to experience.”

 

Poleg Baum, Israel. “If you can, stay in Rishikesh. Explore and evolve your practice”.

 

Neha Rawat, Rishikesh.  “Get confident first. Keep practicing every day before you begin to teach.”

 

Alena Charow, London. “Always do your practice. To remember we are always all students. To practice the yamas and niyamas. And to always have compassion. Practice, practice all is coming.”

 

Priya Negi, Rishikesh. “Practice, practice, practice. Don’t stop the flow. Again come back to Rishikesh whenever you can, seeya!”

 

Nicole Lamb, Australia. “Take your time. Don’t rush your practice or your teachings. All will come naturally and organically. Trust the process and follow your intuition”.

 

Nacho Kaleta, Spain. “They have to be honest within themselves to be able to teach. Teach what you know is right and safe but teach anyway. You’ve learnt a tool which may help others lives. It is your must to share it even if it is only Surya Namaskar”.

 

Oliver Klein,Germany.  “Those who really want to teach, I would tell them that they first have to understand why we are doing each posture and only then it makes sense to teach. If they understand the posture, only then they can show and teach it and then, find your own style of teaching. Also interesting would be to practice with some authorized teacher by PJ.”

 

Deepak Nautiyal, Rishikesh. “Teach from your heart. Whatever you are doing be present and confident”.

 

Gau Monko, Astana, Kazakhstan. “Practice your teaching right after the completion of your course. When all the knowledge is fresh in your head, your hands remember the adjustments and you still feel the supporting energy of your teacher along with their guiding voice in your mind. Make mistakes, it will allow you to learn from them and grow.”

What Is Ashtanga Yoga? Understanding the Methods

Ashtanga yoga, also known as power yoga, is quickly gaining popularity among practitioners. So what is Ashtanga yoga? It is the form of yoga most used by athletes and those interested in quickly increasing strength and stamina. Because of that, Ashtanga yoga postures have a higher degree of difficulty than those in other styles. Additionally, they are done as part of series.

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Usually, students doing Ashtanga yoga postures will move quickly from one to the other to maintain that focus on strength. That is in opposition to many other forms of yoga where the emphasis is on breathing, relaxation, and flexibility.

Who Should Practice Ashtanga Yoga?

Ashtanga yoga poses are for most anyone who is in decent shape. If you are new to exercise, this is probably not the form of yoga with which you should start. Even the very easiest of Ashtanga poses are very demanding on the body, especially since you will even start with a body warming routine that is designed to activate your muscles. Overall, Ashtanga yoga can provide you with a build up of strength, stamina, and even some flexibility which explains its popularity with those involved in athletics.

If you decide to give Ashtanga a try, you should expect things to progress quickly. You will likely start right off with a sequence of yoga poses. Those will be practiced until the teacher feels you have mastered it fairly well and have complete understanding of its fundamentals. Then, you will move on to another series and a higher level of difficulty. Overall, it is a very fast moving form of yoga.

Ashtanga Poses

As for the Ashtanga yoga poses, they range widely in terms of positioning. You will find yourself moving from standing, backbent, inverted, balancing, seated, and even twisting poses. In power yoga, the sun salutation sequence of poses is very popular as well, so you will often use standing forward bend, upward dog, downward dog, and many other poses sprinkled in as well.

Though much of the focus in Ashtanga yoga poses is on the development of stamina and strength, you will also, as with any yoga, be focusing. You will be asked to focus your eyes on a point as you move through the poses given out by your instructor. In order to get the full effect and benefit of Ashtanga, you should make sure that your muscles and perhaps even the rooms are very warm. This ensures maximum flexibility and minimal injury as you work through the demanding postures.

If you are into athletics, exercise, or just want a new physical challenge, perhaps you should consider giving Ashtanga yoga a try. The clear choice of athletes and an increasingly popular form in general, it is perfect for those that are in decent shape and want to increase their strength, stamina, and flexibility. Power yoga is a series of poses taken in a quick and free flowing sequence. Even the classes move quickly with teachers adding more difficult sequences every time one is fairly well mastered. So if you learn fast, like to work hard, and think you are up to the challenge of power yoga, then you may benefit greatly from Ashtanga yoga poses.

Ashtanga yoga is great for losing weight, so if you’re interested in learning about the benefits of yoga breathing and weight loss